Extreme Manufacturing Solutions – Connected Business and Plant Operations

Oct. 8, 2018

Introduction

The growing need for factory operations to meet fast-changing customer and market requirements is driving manufacturers to be more agile and flexible than ever. With high-level objectives to compress time frames and streamline processes, manufacturers are developing new ways to unite their plant and business operations to also optimize resource use, drive customer requirements closer to the production line, and accelerate time to market. In a globally connected marketplace, speed, adaptability, and innovation are the new currencies in the manufacturing realm. Nowhere is this more evident than the convergence of Operations Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT).
Traditionally focused on factory-based assets and processes, OT is largely comprised of plant systems such as sensors, machines, devices, connectors, and applications that manage and monitor operations. For years, OT systems remained a distinct element within manufacturing workflows, but as the benefits of standards-based architectures, reliable high-speed networking, centralized management, and big data analytics transformed the role of IT, the wisdom of merging traditionally separate OT and IT ecosystems in manufacturing environments became unassailable. The ability of IT and OT leaders to jointly develop more agile, flexible, and transparent customer engagement and production models that span business systems, supply chains, and factory environments has today become a prerequisite for success and
growth in the manufacturing sector.

Critical Technology Issues for Connected Business to Plant Operations

BUSINESS CONTINUITY RISKS

The unification of IT/OT systems requires both defining long-term strategies and delivering immediate ROI. Identifying priorities and developing pilot projects that deliver tangible benefit with low risk to existing operations can establish credibility, but too often these technology migrations are plagued by ownership Extreme Manufacturing Solutions Connected Business and Plant Operations disputes, slow and complex deployments, an inability to effectively locate and troubleshoot problems, and suboptimal impacts to mission critical Manufacturing Executions Systems (MES). Without comprehensive management capabilities that provide centralized control over the entire network infrastructure from the edge to the data center, as well as mobile devices and security policies, efforts at unifying plant operations with business systems can be hamstrung by compromised execution, factory downtime, and the diversion of crucial resources into non-productive uses.

LACK OF DEMONSTRABLE ROI

Among the top trends McKinsey cites as impacting manufacturing production are “the astonishing rise in data volumes, computational power, and connectivity” and “improvements in transferring digital instructions to the physical world, such as advanced robotics and 3D printing.” While these innovations demonstrate the value of converging business and production technologies, many manufacturers seeking to leverage these new applications lack visibility into the returns and business impact of these innovations. Without real-time and historical views into the performance and adoption of quicklymainstreaming application technologies that support cloudbased MES, mobility, and the Internet of Things, technology leaders are limited in their ability to prove quantified real-world value to their business units and customers.

COSTLY, CLOSED, AND PROPRIETARY IT ARCHITECTURES

More than ever before, the global manufacturing sector is characterized by acquisitions and partnerships, facility moves and modifications, and a constant search for new market opportunities. For technology leaders, these factors regularly involve inheriting proprietary technology assets from legacy environments. Efforts to standardize the broader ecosystem in these cases become limited by an inability to cost-effectively integrate these systems beyond a perfunctory level. Alternatively, in the case of ‘one-size fit all’ infrastructures, manufacturing customers are often locked-in to executing their projects according to the vendor’s feature roadmap, not the needs of their clients. In addition, support costs for these systems escalate dramatically over time – incongruous in a technology sector increasingly disrupted by software innovation and downward price pressures. Additionally, these closed environments lack truly open standards-based APIs and software development kits, impeding the ability of technology leaders to leverage today’s application-driven world of emerging cloud, security, wireless, and converged SDN opportunities. To learn more visit Extreme’s Manufacturing Solutions site: http://www.extremenetworks.com/manufacturing

Tom Christiansen, CTO from Hitachi Vantara discussing data driven decisions in a smart city with the Dutch Government.

Sep. 27, 2018

Yesterday we met with a delegation of the Dutch Government at www.DOLL-LivingLab.com in Copenhagen. The purpose was to discuss how they could develop a culture of data driven decision making, rather than relying on year old expertise and gut feeling. We discussed why data-driven decisions are more accurate and better for productivity and cost optimization, which resonated well with the need for improving the Public sector in general. The big questions around privacy and ethics were raised when we touched upon government readiness to adopt advanced data and video analytics in combination with AI.

All together a great day with honest and relevant discussions. A couple of highlights from the discussion below:

  • How to move away from gut feelings to data-driven decisions
  • Data sources is disconnected because it is retained in silos in various departments
  • Feedback reporting delays can interfere with the control of the strategies
  • Data democracy is important – we have a ton of data but poor on insight
  • Leave data where it has been created and focus on integration and outcome
  • Information can be biased and filtered as it propagates through the management chains
  • Often there are significant issues with gaps in the data needed for the decision making
  • Data privacy with Hitachi data and video analytics in combination with Hitachi AI

At the end of the presentation, we went through different urban use cases and we demonstrated an edge to outcome solution running in the local community of the DOLL living lap: The Smart Pole (IoT end-to-end) for lighting, weather and temperature collection in combination with 5G implementation in a city.

Extreme Manufacturing Solutions – Operations Performance Analytics

Sep. 7, 2018

Introduction

The growing need for factory operations to meet fast-changing customer and market requirements is driving manufacturers to be more agile and flexible than ever. With high-level objectives to compress time frames and streamline processes, manufacturers are developing new ways to unite their plant and business operations to also optimize resource use, drive customer requirements closer to the production line, and accelerate time to market. In a globally connected marketplace, speed, adaptability, and innovation are the new currencies in the manufacturing realm. Nowhere is this more evident than the convergence of Operations Technology (OT) and Information Technology
(IT).Traditionally focused on factory-based assets and processes, OT is largely comprised of plant systems such as sensors, machines,
devices, connectors, and applications that manage and monitor operations. For years, OT systems remained a distinct element within manufacturing workflows, but as the benefits of standards-based architectures, reliable high-speed networking, centralized management, and big data analytics transformed the role of IT, the wisdom of merging traditionally separate OT and IT ecosystems in manufacturing environments became unassailable. The ability of IT and OT leaders to jointly develop more agile, flexible, and transparent customer engagement and production models that span business systems, supply chains, and factory environments has today become a prerequisite for success and growth in the manufacturing sector.

Critical Technology Issues for Operations Performance Analytics (OPA)

BREAKING DOWN TRADITIONAL IT/ OPERATIONS SILOS

Seamlessly moving data across plant and business functions, and Extreme Manufacturing Solutions Operations Performance Analytics
applying analytical tools to enable new insights, requires a new approach into managing applications, networks, and systems. Tradition monitoring tools in factory environments were often isolated, closed-end systems, offering only a keyhole view of IT and operations performance. Additionally, the proprietary and separate nature of traditional networks in factory and business environments reduced shared visibility and added management complexity, resulting in either incompatible data sharing models or diffused responsibilities between the IT and Operations Technology teams.

These challenges are driving innovative manufacturers to increasingly leverage their wired and wireless networks as the focal point for reliably and consistently collecting data about applications, devices, users, geo-locations, bandwidth utilization, and much more. This “from the source” data can then be leveraged not only to track traditional network connectivity performance, but also deliver deep mission-critical insights into manufacturing application performance, real-time interactions, security postures, compliance metrics, and IT-driven business intelligence, as well as myriad other performance indicators.

GAINING CONTEXTUAL VISIBILITY INTO OPERATIONS

By capturing granular and contextual data traversing the network, manufacturers traditionally impeded by a lack of interoperability are now able apply network policies throughout the extended production process, track application performance across edge, data center and cloud environments, and share actionable data with vendors, partners, and business leaders to inform and improve decision-making. For example, a biotechnology firm investing in a cloud-based Manufacturing Execution System (MES) can now view application and location based wired/wireless network data to pro-actively identify performance issues on the plant floor, and ensure more reliable application response while ensuring that compliance and regulatory requirements are met and recorded. Predictive features can also automatically identify, report, and handle issues before they become problems and cause costly downtime to plant operations.

PROTECTING DATA ACROSS THE SUPPLY CHAIN

With each of the millions of connected sensors, devices, applications, and users in today’s extended manufacturing ecosystem serving as a prospective entry point for a security breach, managing the threats present in the new data driven manufacturing environment is paramount. The consequences of a breach can be devastating, not only for the business, but also for consumers ultimately at the end of the supply chain. Yet in the drive to increase efficiency, transparency, and connectivity, traditional approaches centered solely on firewalls and mobile device management lack safeguards against threats originating internally, across interconnected production facilities, and from newly converged business networks. Rigorous security compliance standards in manufacturing operations are needed to protect access to the network and maintain real-time protection against evolving threats – beginning with visibility into the profile and architecture of
approved applications, devices, and users, and the creation of a universal threat prevention posture that adapts to both functional challenges and the inevitable modifications to the IT/OT environments. To learn more visit Extreme’s Manufacturing Solutions site:
http://www.extremenetworks.com/manufacturing

Veeam Ransomware Resilience, Availability and Recovery

Aug. 28, 2018

Originating in 1989, ransomware attacks have started spreading internationally around 2012, with infection approaches becoming more and more sophisticated and attack delivery getting easier and easier.
The U.S. Department of Justice recently referred to ransomware as a new business model for cybercrime and a global phenomenon.

As ransomware becomes a mainstream threat, cybersecurity spending forecasts show substantial growth moving forward. Leveraging data protection and security best practices is crucial to protect your company’s Digital Life.
Veeam® offers businesses and end users the confidence that their Digital Life will be Always-On™ and uninterrupted by ensuring they have the right ransomware resilience and recovery plans in place.

Read this Executive Brief to learn more about:

  • How to stay resilient against ransomware with data protection best practices
  • How to combat ransomware with Availability and recovery solutions
  • Unique Veeam solutions for ransomware resilience and efficient data recovery.

http://exe4um.lv/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/ransomware-data-protection-guide.pdf

Hitachi Smart Spaces and Video Intelligence

Aug. 27, 2018

Smart Spaces and Video Intelligence for public areas, are the building blocks for smart cities: they help all areas and organizations become safer and more effective so they can thrive. Check this video to learn how cities, airports, campuses, retail, transportation agencies, and law enforcement can improve operations, safety, and experiences, with Hitachi Smart Spaces and Video Intelligence.

https://www.hitachivantara.com/en-us/video/smart-spaces-video-intelligence.html

“Hitachi Smart Spaces and Video Intelligence is being used by the city to gain data about bike, transit, foot, and vehicle traffic, as well as parking and public safety. This supports our smart city goals to improve efficiency, diversify our economy and drive innovation.”
– Michael Sherwood, Director of Technology and Innovation, City of Las Vegas

Video link https://www.hitachivantara.com/en-us/news-resources/resources.html#vid=5834289187001